Kohlrabi Potato Soup

Now that I (Sarah, that is) have a bit more free time, I hope to add a bit more regularly to this blog and to spend a little more time practicing photography.  Here’s a great dish that Rabi recently made.  Now that our garden has wrapped up for the year, we are left with hardy and root vegetables, such as kohlrabi and potatoes.  Rabi found a recipe for Kohlrabi Potato Soup, and this is a great, tasty way to use kohlrabi, especially if you are sick of eating it raw or in stir-frys.  The original recipe can be found here, and the only difference that Rabi made was that he used our red potatoes from the garden and didn’t peel them.  Our version of the soup turned out much lighter in color, but we’re not sure why. I strongly suggest that you definitely make use of the toppings – they are a nice balance to the rooty soup.

Kohlrabi Potato Soup

Tofu Curry Scramble

There are not many things coming from our garden right now that are more beautiful than our Rainbow Chard.

Rainbow ChardIn addition to it being beautiful (and packed full of nutrients), it’s also very plentiful, leaving us stumped as to how to use it all.  Here’s our latest meal, Tofu Curry Scramble, adapted from Super Natural Cooking by Heidi Swanson:

Ingredients:

  • 1 package of extra-firm tofu
  • 1 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 a large yellow onion, chopped
  • about 1/8 tsp ground coriander
  • about 1/8 tsp ground cumin
  • about 1/4 tsp turmeric
  • about 1/16 tsp cayenne
  • about 1/2 tsp curry powder
  • about 3 cups of chopped Rainbow Chard (or other dark, leafy green)
  • 1/4 tsp salt

Drain tofu, wrap in a towel, and place a weight (I used our empty cast iron) on top to press out as much liquid as possible.  I let it sit under the weight for about 10 minutes or so.  Heat coconut oil over medium heat in a wok and add onion and garlic. Saute until onion softens, then stir in all the spices. Crumble all the tofu into the wok, then cover for about 5 minutes, checking it once to stir and scrap any browning bits off the bottom. Add the chard and fold into the tofu mixture until chard gets a bit wilty.  Add the salt and keep folding the mixture until well incorporated.  Enjoy!

Note: You could add more curry or other spices to bulk up the flavor a bit more.  You could also top it off with various condiments – Rabi put some sriracha sauce on it, which he said was pretty good.

Tofu Curry Scramble

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Bread

Pumpkin Chocolate Chip BreadThis recipes comes from the Chequamegon Co-op Cookbook, but I’ve modified it to be a bread recipe (as opposed to a muffin recipe), gluten-free, and dairy-free.  It’s a hearty, delicious bread that will give you a dose of complete protein (thanks buckwheat!) and sweetness.

Ingredients:
1 2/3 cup buckwheat flour
1/2 tsp xanthan gum
1 1/3 cup sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp nutmeg
3/4 tsp salt
heaping 1/2 cup chocolate chips (or more)
heaping 1/4 cup toffee bits (optional–I don’t use)
1/2 c chopped walnuts or pecans (optional–I don’t use)
1 tsp vanilla
1/3 c melted non-dairy butter
2 eggs
1 cup (half a 15 oz can) of solid pack pumpkin
1/3 cup water

Glaze:
1 1/2 cup powdered sugar
2 tbsp rice milk

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Whisk together dry ingredients, stir in chocolate chips, toffee bits, and nuts (if using).  In a separate bowl, mix together vanilla, melted butter, eggs, pumpkin, and water. Make a well in dry ingredients and fill it with liquid ingredients and mix. Pour into a greased bread pan and bake 40-50 minutes.  Start checking the doneness around 40 minutes by sticking a knife in the middle of the loaf to see if it comes out clean.  If not, keep baking until it does.  If the top of the loaf starts to brown, cover with tinfoil and keep baking.  Once done, let cool in bread pan about 10 minutes, then turn out onto a cooling rack.  Whisk together powdered sugar and milk.  Once cool, you may add the glaze (although it’s great without the glaze too!).

Chocolate Cookies

chocolate cookies
It’s winter, which means it’s baking time!  I had a hankering for chocolate today, so I searched high and low for a recipe that I could make without having to go pick stuff up at the grocery store.  Chocolate mousse?  Nope. Brownies? Nope. Cake?  Nope.
Thank goodness for Martha Stewart.  I ran across this recipe, which was easy to cut in half (because I was running low on flour) and make gluten free and dairy free.  My revised version is below (makes between 12-15 cookies).

Ingredients:4 oz. semisweet chocolate (make sure it’s dairy free!)
2 Tbsp Earth Balance butter
1/3 cup gluten free flour
a little less than 1/2 tsp xanthan gum
1/4 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
1 egg
1/4 cup + 2 Tbsp brown sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 a package of dairy free chocolate chips (we like dark chocolate)

Directions
Place the semisweet chocolate and butter in a bowl and microwave in 20 intervals, mixing each time, until melted (don’t overcook!).  In a bowl, mix together flour, baking powder, xanthan gum, and salt.  In mixing bowl, beat eggs, brown sugar, and vanilla until fluffy (or at least until very well mixed).  Add in chocolate mixture and mix well.  Add in flour mixture and mix until just incorporated. Stir in chocolate chips.  The batter won’t be as firm as regular cookie dough–this is okay!  Drop heaping spoonfuls onto a baking sheet (no need to grease first) and bake at 350 degrees for about 12 minutes, rotating the baking sheets halfway through baking.  Let cool on pan for about 10 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool.  The cookies are meant to be soft and chewy!
cookie close-up

Portobello Pizza

Pizzas

On of our biggest challenges with eating gluten free is pizza.  We love pizza, but we hate making gluten free crust.  It never turns out as well as store bought gluten free crust and definitely is never as good as the real thing.  Today, I stumbled upon this recipe, which removes the crust factor altogether and makes a “pizza” out of portobello mushrooms.  Delicious and filling!  I followed the linked recipe pretty exactly (using heirloom tomatoes and omitted the fresh parsley) and it made four pizzas.  I also substituted coconut oil for olive oil, as I was recently told that I needed to increase my intake of healthy fats.  We couldn’t really taste the coconut, but it sure smelled nice while it was cooking!

Portobello

Filling

Chili Con Carne

ChiliThis recipe comes to us from the City Market Co-op’s archive of recipes, found on their website.  While the recipe calls for ground beef in addition to beans, we both agreed that beef was not necessary and that the amount of beans could be increased or decreased to your liking.  I definitely recommend investing in some good toppings (like vegan sour cream, vegan cheese, and avocado), as that really made the dish delicious!  Be prepared for plenty of leftovers for the week’s lunches.

For the recipe (and more recipes), click here.  Please note that the recipe calls for cooking the chili for about 60-90 minutes.  This is if you use dried beans.  I used canned beans and cooked it for about 20 minutes (to thoroughly heat the beans through).

Purple Cabbage Rolls

Cabbage Rolls 001

These cabbage rolls were made with purple cabbage from our Intervale Food Hub share. These folks support the local food system by creating a type of community supported agriculture (CSA) from a conglomeration of local, organic farms. I used a very basic recipe from About.com and modified the method for getting the cabbage off of the head. I also used arrowroot powder instead of cornstarch (kudzu would also work).

To remove the leaves, use a large chef’s knife and cut around the core at about a 45 degree angle. Remove the core. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil. When boiling, place the head of cabbage in the pot. It should take about 3 minutes to soften up the outer leaf. I used chopsticks to remove the leaves one by one and set aside on a plate. The chopsticks are gentle on the leaves and avoid puncturing the leaves.